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Paris Agreement &#39decisive turning point&#39 on climate change, says new UN senior adviser

29 January 2016 – Less than two months after 196 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the Paris Agreement, the global community is already seeing signs of it being a decisive turning point, according to a senior UN official dealing with climate issues.

A month and a half since 196 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the Paris Agreement, the global community is already seeing signs of it being a decisive turning point, according to a senior UN official dealing with climate issues.

“Much has been happening since Paris – the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) confirmed that 2015 was the hottest year on record, not just by a little but by a lot,” Janos Pasztor, who was today appointed as Senior Adviser to the Secretary-General on Climate Change, told reporters at a briefing in New York.

For the past year, Mr. Pasztor had been leading the UN’s climate change efforts as Assistant Secretary-General on Climate Change, working towards last December’s 21st United Nations climate change conference (COP21).

Recalling that UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has invited world leaders to a signing ceremony on 22 April – which coincides with International Mother Earth Day – the climate advisor noted that it will be the first day the Agreement is open for formal signatures.

He said Mr. Ban is urging countries to quickly ratify the agreement so it can enter into force as soon as possible, adding that the event will also be an opportunity to discuss efforts to implement national climate plans, known as INDCs, and to generally “maintain the momentum of the action agenda.”

Meanwhile, he underlined the Secretary-General’s recent call for a doubling of investments in clean energy by 2020, which he said was greeted “very positively” by many investors.

“The Paris Agreement sent a clear message to markets and investors that it’s time to get serious about climate change. We’re now seeing evidence that the signal has been received loud and clear,” Mr. Pasztor stressed.

Meanwhile, in a statement issued by the UN Spokesperson’s Office, Mr. Ban expressed his deep gratitude for Mr. Pasztor’s “dedicated service and leadership” over the past quarter of a century with the world body on the key global challenges of climate change, energy and sustainability.

“In his new role as Senior Adviser to the Secretary-General on Climate Change, Mr. Pasztor will support efforts of the Secretary-General to mobilize world leaders and all sectors of society to implement the landmark Paris Agreement,” the statement indicated.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53126

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Paris Agreement ‘decisive turning point’ on climate change, says new UN senior adviser

29 January 2016 – Less than two months after 196 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the Paris Agreement, the global community is already seeing signs of it being a decisive turning point, according to a senior UN official dealing with climate issues.

A month and a half since 196 parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the Paris Agreement, the global community is already seeing signs of it being a decisive turning point, according to a senior UN official dealing with climate issues.

“Much has been happening since Paris – the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) confirmed that 2015 was the hottest year on record, not just by a little but by a lot,” Janos Pasztor, who was today appointed as Senior Adviser to the Secretary-General on Climate Change, told reporters at a briefing in New York.

For the past year, Mr. Pasztor had been leading the UN’s climate change efforts as Assistant Secretary-General on Climate Change, working towards last December’s 21st United Nations climate change conference (COP21).

Recalling that UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has invited world leaders to a signing ceremony on 22 April – which coincides with International Mother Earth Day – the climate advisor noted that it will be the first day the Agreement is open for formal signatures.

He said Mr. Ban is urging countries to quickly ratify the agreement so it can enter into force as soon as possible, adding that the event will also be an opportunity to discuss efforts to implement national climate plans, known as INDCs, and to generally “maintain the momentum of the action agenda.”

Meanwhile, he underlined the Secretary-General’s recent call for a doubling of investments in clean energy by 2020, which he said was greeted “very positively” by many investors.

“The Paris Agreement sent a clear message to markets and investors that it’s time to get serious about climate change. We’re now seeing evidence that the signal has been received loud and clear,” Mr. Pasztor stressed.

Meanwhile, in a statement issued by the UN Spokesperson’s Office, Mr. Ban expressed his deep gratitude for Mr. Pasztor’s “dedicated service and leadership” over the past quarter of a century with the world body on the key global challenges of climate change, energy and sustainability.

“In his new role as Senior Adviser to the Secretary-General on Climate Change, Mr. Pasztor will support efforts of the Secretary-General to mobilize world leaders and all sectors of society to implement the landmark Paris Agreement,” the statement indicated.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53126

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Livestock biodiversity must be preserved as vital tool against climate change – UN agency

27 January 2016 – The genetic diversity of livestock can play a vital role in feeding the world in the face of hotter weather and the other effects of climate change, yet many valuable breeds continue to be at risk, the United Nations agricultural agency warned today, calling for stronger global efforts to safeguard the existing gene pool.

“Genetic diversity is a prerequisite for adaptation in the face of future challenges,” UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Director-General José Graziano da Silva said, releasing a new agency report highlighting the need to ensure that animal genetic resources are used to promote global food security and remain available for future generations.

Indiscriminate cross-breeding is the main cause of genetic erosion, according to the FAO’s Second Report on the State of the World’s Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, which also cited the increasing use of non-native breeds, weak regulation, the decline of traditional production and neglect of breeds considered not competitive enough.

Beyond climate change, future challenges include emerging diseases, pressure on land and water, and shifting market demands, which make it more important than ever to ensure animal genetic resources are conserved and used sustainably.

Cross-breeding, embraced by developing countries which import genetic material to enhance milk productivity and speed up an animal’s path to maturity, can lead to loss of valuable characteristics such as the ability to cope with extremes of temperature, limited water supplies, poor-quality feed, rough terrain, high altitudes and other challenging environmental conditions.

Source: UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

As an example, the report cited Brazil’s Pantaneiro cattle who have lived in the Pantanal region since being introduced by the Portuguese 400 years ago. They are believed to be resistant to various parasite-induced diseases, worms and ticks and are able to survive both floods and droughts and thrive on the course native pastures.

At the beginning of the 20th century there were several thousand, but there are now only 500 pure-bred animals, threatening to erode the breed’s capacity to adapt and survive. Commercial breeds have lost some gene variants associated with fitness and survival in harsh environments, and intermixing with commercial breeds is the main threat to the Pantneiro’s survival.

According to the report, 1,458 of the world’s farm animal breeds, about 17 per cent of the total, are currently at risk of extinction, while the risk status of 58 per cent is simply unknown due to lack of data on the size and structure of their populations.

Nearly 100 livestock breeds worldwide have gone extinct between 2000 and 2014, with Europe/Caucasus and North America the two areas with the highest proportion of at-risk breeds. Both areas are characterized by highly specialized livestock industries that tend to use only a small number of breeds for production.

A total of 129 countries participated in the new global assessment, which comes nearly a decade after the First Report in 2007 and suggests there has been some improvement since then as Governments overall have stepped up efforts to halt genetic erosion manage their breeds more sustainably.

In 2007, fewer than 10 countries reported having established a gene bank. That number has now risen to 64 and an additional 41 are planning to establish such banks.

“Over the last decade, countries across Europe have invested heavily in building shared information systems and gene banks as security measures,” said FAO Animal Production Officer Beate Scherf, a co-author of the new report.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53100

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Global investors must play full role in shifting world to clean energy, says UN chief

27 January 2016 – More than 500 global investors gathered at United Nations Headquarters in New York today to mobilize the trillions of dollars needed to move the world onto the path of clean energy, with Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon challenging them to, at a minimum, double clean energy investments to $660 billion by 2020.

“Markets now have the clear signal they need to unleash the full force of human ingenuity and scale up investments that can generate low-emissions resilient growth,” he said , speaking just days after scientists confirmed that 2015 was the hottest year on record.

“The world now counts on you to act at the speed and scale needed to transform the global economy. To keep global temperature rise well below 2 degrees, and even 1.5 degrees, we must begin the shift away from fossil fuels immediately. We need a massive scaling up of investments in clean energy and energy efficiency,” he said.

Organized by the non-profit Ceres, the UN Foundation and the UN Office for Partnerships, the all-day meeting sought to catalyze a global shift toward exponentially cleaner energy fast enough to meet the long-term objective of December’s Paris climate accord to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to zero to avoid dangerous climate warming.

“In 2015, clean energy investments stood at around $330 billion dollars, more than six times higher than in 2004. This is a good down-payment, but far less than the “clean trillion” needed annually throughout the coming decades to keep temperature rise to acceptable levels and limit the risks from climate change,” Mr. Ban said, laying out five steps for the investor action.

  • National climate plans of developing countries must be financed, with institutional investors particularly well placed to provide the significant amounts of capital needed.
  • Pension funds must use their influence as investors and shareholders to accelerate the rapid de-carbonization of the economy.
  • The banking sector must continue scaling up the green bond market while changing its lending practices to support green investments, reflecting the growing risk in the brown economy.
  • The insurance industry must strengthen climate resilience and disaster risk reduction efforts, especially in the most vulnerable countries.
  • Investors need to know how the impacts of climate change can affect specific companies, sectors and financial markets as a whole, with clearer disclosure.

“Investors and businesses that redirect resources to low-carbon, climate-resilient growth will be the economic powerhouses of the 21st century,” Mr. Ban concluded. “Those that fail to do so will be on the losing side of history. Every decision on investment and resource allocation must be part of the solution. Every dollar must be invested in low-carbon goods and services.

“The private sector is the engine that will drive the climate solutions we need to reduce climate risks, end energy poverty and create a safer, more prosperous future for this and future generations. Each of you has a major role to play,” said the UN chief.

For her part, Mindy Lubber, President of Ceres and director of its Investor Network on Climate Risk (INCR) said investors are better positioned than ever before to address climate risks and seize the economic opportunities presented by clean energy.

“Ultimately, global investment portfolios need to shift far more capital to low-carbon business activity and away from risky high carbon sectors that may perform poorly in the years ahead,” she added.

Ms. Lubber called on all investors globally to set ambitious clean energy investment commitments; establish clear goals for reducing carbon risk exposure in their portfolios; encourage regulators worldwide to implement mandatory climate risk disclosure requirements; and to continue advocating for policies such as economically meaningful carbon pricing and ending fossil fuel subsidies.


Participants at the 2016 Investor Summit on Climate Risk, co-hosted by the United Nations Foundation, Ceres and the United Nations Office for Partnerships, UN Headquarters, NY UN Photo/Mark Garten


”Cities and businesses recognize the economic benefits that come with fighting climate change, and they’re setting a great example by establishing clear goals and measuring the impact of their work,” said Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP, three-term Mayor of New York City, the UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change, and chair of the Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures, who joined a discussion on climate risk disclosure.

”The more reliable information investors have about climate change, the easier it is for them to make informed decisions, and that will help drive more financing to projects that reduce carbon pollution and promote sustainable economic growth,” he said.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53101

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As food emergency intensifies in drought-hit Ethiopia, UN appeals for more resources

26 January 2016 – Despite the well-coordinated response already under way to offset the impacts of an El Niño-induced drought in Ethiopia, the United Nations humanitarian wing has warned that the scale of the developing emergency exceeds resources and that more funding is urgently needed to ensure food distribution and child protection amid ongoing malnutrition and water shortages.

“Resources currently in-hand do not guarantee a full relief food basket for beneficiaries,” said the latest weekly update on Ethiopia compiled by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

It also added that “without additional resources, the food sector projects a full pipeline break in a couple of months.”

$1.2 billion is needed for food relief to10.2 million people. However, the current appeal is only funded by one third.

Given the lead times necessary for the procurement of relief items, the Government and its international partners have called for early action to this slow onset natural disaster.

Fragmentation of delivery is of critical priority as it has negative implications for nutrition and health, and the beneficiaries have to travel more than twice to the food distribution point within short period.

Meanwhile, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) is helping deliver food to 2 million people and has started using the humanitarian supplies from the Port of Berbera in Somaliland.

Further, the allocation-dispatch-distribution is being finalized in about 4 weeks and the geographic and programmatic priorities for the first quarter of 2016 have also been completed by OCHA’s inter-cluster group and its country team.

Child protection is another concern due to drought, as poor families are taking negative coping mechanisms such as child marriage. As such, Child Protection Rapid Assessments (CPRA) validation and drought response planning workshops are being held at national and regional levels. However, financial requirements are also expected to expedite this exercise.

The El Niño global climactic event has wreaked havoc on Ethiopia’s summer rains, says OCHA. This comes on the heels of failed spring rains, and has driven food insecurity, malnutrition and water shortages in affected areas of the country.

The current El Niño pattern, being the strongest ever recorded, has caused severe drought in the Horn of Africa nation, resulting in crop reduction by 50 to 90 per cent and leaving some 10.2 million people food insecure.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53095

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‘2015 is hottest year on record’ – UN weather agency

25 January 2016 – The global average surface temperature in 2015 broke all previous records by a strikingly wide margin, according to the United Nations World Meteorological Organization (WMO), which announced today that for the first time on record, temperatures were about 1 degree Celsius above the pre-industrial era.

“An exceptionally strong El Niño and global warming caused by greenhouse gases joined forces with dramatic effect on the climate system in 2015,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas in a press release.

“The power of El Niño will fade in the coming months but the impacts of human-induced climate change will be with us for many decades. We have reached for the first time the threshold of 1 degree Celsius above pre-industrial temperatures. It is a sobering moment in the history of our planet,” he added.

WMO combines three internationally-renowned observational datasets with those from sophisticated reanalysis systems, allowing it to provide “the most authoritative international reference source.”

According to its data, 15 of the 16 hottest years on record have all been this century, with 2015 being significantly warmer than the record-level temperatures seen in 2014. Underlining the long-term trend, 2011-15 is the warmest five-year period on record.

Meanwhile, the record temperatures over both land and the ocean surface in 2015 were accompanied by many extreme weather events such as heatwaves, flooding and severe drought.

“If the commitments made during the climate change negotiations in Paris and furthermore a higher emission reduction ambition level is reached, we still have chance to stay within the maximum 2 degree Celsius limit,” Mr. Taalas highlighted, referring to the temperature rise the international community has set itself not to surpass.

“Climate change will have increasingly negative impacts for at least the next five decades,” he continued. “This emphasizes the need to invest in adaptation besides mitigation. It is important to strengthen the capability of countries to provide better disaster early warnings to minimize human and economic losses. Climate change increases the risk of weather related disasters which are an obstacle to sustainable development,” he added.

WMO will issue its full report on the status of the global climate in 2015 next March, with comprehensive details of regional trends, extreme events, sea ice, sea level rise and tropical cyclones.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53088

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El Niño threatens at least 60 million people in high-risk developing countries – UN agency

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22 January 2016 – El Niño threatens at least 60 million people in high-risk developing countries – UN agency

The United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) and its partners announced today they predict a major global increase in health consequences of emergencies this year due to El Niño.

El Niño is a warming of the central to eastern tropical Pacific Ocean which affects rainfall patterns and temperatures in many parts of the world but most intensely in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America which are particularly vulnerable to natural hazards. Typically, some places receive much more rain than normal while others receive much less.

“From Ethiopia to Haiti to Papua New Guinea, we are seeing the damage from El Niño, and we believe the impact on public health is likely to continue throughout 2016, even after El Niño winds down,” said Dr Richard Brennan, Director of WHO’s Emergency Risk Management Humanitarian Response Department, in a

press release.

“To prevent unnecessary deaths and illnesses, governments must invest now in strengthening their preparedness and response efforts,” he highlighted.

According to a new report by WHO, severe drought, flooding, heavy rains and temperature rises are all known effects of El Niño that can lead to food insecurity and malnutrition, disease outbreaks, acute water shortages, and disruption of health services.

The health implications are usually more intense in developing countries with fewer capacities to reduce the health consequences. The current El Niño from 2015 to 2016 is predicted to be the worst in recent years, and comparable to the El Niño in 1997-1998 which had major health consequences worldwide.

In Eastern Africa, as a result of the El Niño in 1997-1998, WHO found that rainfall patterns were unusually heavy and led to serious flooding and major outbreaks of malaria, cholera and Rift Valley Fever.

Based on the latest UN figures, the report estimates 60 million people will be impacted by El Niño this year with many suffering health consequences. Thus far, requests for financial support by seven high-risk countries – Ethiopia, Lesotho, Kenya, Papua New Guinea, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda – have reached $76 million.

WHO expects more countries will seek financial support to respond to El Niño effectively. Part of the response will be to provide additional health services to those in need, such as increased surveillance and emergency vaccination. Immediate needs also require funds to provide treatments for severely malnourished children in many countries, such as Ethiopia.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53066

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Sustainable energy can ‘save millions of lives,’ Ban tells summit in Abu Dhabi

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18 January 2016 – Millions of lives can be saved by ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today stressed at the World Future Energy Summit taking place in the United Arab Emirates.

“Sustainable energy is the thread that connects economic growth, social equity, and our efforts to combat climate change,” Mr. Ban told industry leaders from around the world attending the week-long conference in Abu Dhabi.

Highlighting last year’s “landmark” global agreements on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and on climate change at COP21 in December, the UN chief noted that for the first time, every country in the world pledged to act internationally and domestically to address climate change.

“The universality of these agreements, and their inclusive nature, mean that we have a clear way forward,” he said. “Now is the time for action. Governments, the private sector, regional and international organizations, must start working to implement the 17 ambitious Global Goals,” he said.

One of these Goals – SDG7 – aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. He explained that clean, sustainable energy will not only help safeguard the future of the planet – keeping temperature rise below the two degree Celsius goal – it will also directly save an estimated 4.3 million lives every year. That is the estimated number of people who die prematurely from pollution resulting from indoor cookstoves that use fire, coal, charcoal or animal waste.

“Most of these people are women and children, who spend their time near wood-burning stoves and open flames. It is women and girls who bear the brunt of collecting firewood and fuels – time-consuming activities which limit their work and education opportunities,” the UN chief warned.

He added that SDG7 is also at the heart of development, since more than one billion people in the world have no access to electricity.

“Achieving SDG7 well before 2030 will vastly improve our chances of achieving the Global Goals on food security, health care, education, employment, sustainable cities and more,” he declared. “We have made a good start. There has been remarkable progress on many fronts.”

The Secretary-General noted that a new generation of energy-efficient appliances is giving people access to the lighting, heating, communication and other tools that they need, while reminding all leaders and decision-makers at the Summit that emissions must be cut drastically and counterproductive subsidies must end.

“Governments and the private sector will need to align their decisions,” he insisted. “Every dollar of the trillions that will be spent on new infrastructure in the next 15 years must be invested in climate-friendly projects that will drive the growth of low-carbon goods and services.”

Ending his remarks, he underlined the important role women play in seeking sustainable solutions. “Women are often the primary managers of energy in their households and communities and so can be powerful agents of change in the transition to sustainable, clean, green energy.”

Later in the day, the Secretary-General spoke at the launch of “Abu Dhabi Action Day,” saying how inspired he was by presentations showcased at the Summit, especially those created by young people.

“I am so honoured and excited to see that all of you are part of a global push to do something even bigger than adopt a global agreement on climate change – namely to make it a reality.”

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53026

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&#39Renewable energy is limitless and will last forever,&#39 says Ban at global debate

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17 January 2016 – Everyone involved in energy—governments, the private sector, investors and financial institutions, cities, and people everywhere–has understood that we can no longer burn our way to global prosperity, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon declared today at a debate hosted by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and the Financial Times.

“We all know that renewable energy is limitless and will last forever,” Mr. Ban said in the United Arab Emirates capital, Abu Dhabi.

“It offers us great security and peace of mind,” he added. “Costs have come down so quickly that it is now often the cheapest option. And the more renewable energy facilities we build, the cheaper they will become.”

The UN chief noted that since his last visit in 2012, enormous changes have occurred—with the springing up of solar panels and wind turbines. He also highlighted the landmark agreements reach last year by the international community on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and on climate change.

“Renewable energy is central to both,” he stressed. “It will help provide solutions to the climate challenge, and to poverty, food security and many other challenges. Clean, renewable energy will act as a catalyst and a force-multiplier for the SDGs. If we achieve it well before 2030, it will vastly improve our chances of achieving the other SDGs.”

The Secretary-General urged leaders to maintain the momentum and redouble efforts on all their initiatives, insisting that access to clean energy is essential to leave no one behind in the move to zero carbon emissions.

“Events like this are vital to spread the word and spur other companies and institutions to examine their energy consumption and take part in the transition,” he said. “One of the highlights in Paris [COP21] was the wave of announcements from the private sector, investors and financial institutions, cities and governments on their commitments to renewables.”

Recalling that in 2011 he launched Sustainable Energy for All, as a global platform for all partners to come together across issues of energy access, renewables and energy efficiency, Mr. Ban underlined that thousands of actors from all sectors and regions of the world have stepped up to the challenge.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=53023

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Ban calls on global community to stand with Haiti on eve of 6th anniversary of earthquake

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11 January 2016 – As the United Nations prepares to mark the sixth anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Haiti and pay tribute to the more than 200,000 victims who perished, including 102 UN personnel, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today called on the international community to “stand with Haiti” as it moves forward to rebuild.

“United and in solidarity with all Haitians who have lost loved ones to this catastrophe, we honour the memory of our colleagues,” said Mr. Ban in a
statement issued by his Spokesperson.

“The path to recovery and long-term development is not an easy one. Many Haitians continue to face multiple challenges, including displacement, food insecurity and lack of access to clean water and sanitation,” he continued, stressing that Haiti remains in need of international support.

Reaffirming the continued commitment of the United Nations to support the Haitian people, the world body’s chief underlined that while victims of the tragedy are honoured, the commemoration must be a “source of renewed inspiration and a call to unite behind a vision for a stable, democratic and prosperous future for Haiti.”

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=52977

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Australian national takes the helm as new UN disaster risk reduction chief

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8 January 2016 – Following his appointment by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Robert Glasser, an experienced leader and thinker on development issues, took up his new role this week as head of the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR).

“This is a very exciting time to be leading UNISDR as it enters a new era marked by the promotion and implementation of the Sendia Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 which seeks substantial reductions in disaster losses including mortality, the numbers of persons affected by disasters, economic losses and damage to critical infrastructure such as schools and hospitals,” Mr. Glasser said in a press statement.

“Reducing disaster risk is core to the achievement of the post-2015 development agenda including the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on climate change,” he continued.

“We live in a world where 90 per cent of disasters are now climate-related, so there needs to be significant integration of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation efforts to ensure that climate change is not seen as a risk driver in isolation from other risk factors such as poverty, rapid urbanisation, non-compliance with building codes, environmental degradation and population expansion in exposed areas such as flood plains and coastal areas.”

He succeeds Margareta Wahlström who completed two terms at the end of 2015.

Article source: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=52965

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